Posts for: June, 2014

By Sandusky and Lexington Dental Care
June 18, 2014
Category: Oral Health
Top5TipsforTeethingTots

If your infant is extra cranky and seems to want to chew everything in sight, it's a good bet that the first tooth is on the way! For parents, this is cause for both celebration and concern. After all, no parent wants to see a child suffer even a little bit. Decades ago, when a teething infant showed signs of discomfort, a parent might have rubbed some whisky or other strong liquor on the child's gums — a misguided and dangerous practice. There are far safer, more effective ways to help your child through this exciting yet sometimes uncomfortable phase of development. Here are our top five teething remedies:

Chilled rubber teething rings or pacifiers. Cold can be very soothing, but be careful not to freeze teething rings or pacifiers; ice can actually burn the sensitive tissues of the mouth if left in place too long.

Cold, wet washcloths. These are great for gnawing on. Make sure the washcloth is clean and that you leave part of it dry to make it more comfortable to hold.

Cold foods. When your child is old enough, cold foods such as popsicles may soothe sore gums. However, make sure you confine them to mealtimes because sugars can cause tooth decay — even in very young children.

Gum massage. Massaging inflamed gums with your clean finger can help counteract the pressure from an erupting tooth.

Over-the-counter medicine. If teething pain persists, you can give your baby acetaminophen or ibuprofen, but check with a pharmacist or this office for the correct dosage. The medicine should be swallowed and not massaged into the sore areas, as this, too, can burn.

So when does it all begin? Some babies start teething as early as three months or as late as twelve months, but the typical time frame is between six and nine months. Usually the two lower front teeth erupt first, followed by the two upper front teeth. The first molars come in next, followed by the canines (eyeteeth). Most children have all 20 of their baby teeth by age 3.

If you have any questions about teething or the development of your child's teeth, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Teething Troubles.”


By Sandusky and Lexington Dental Care
June 10, 2014
Category: Oral Health
Tags: oral health   oral cancer  
ReducingYourRiskofOralCancer

Oral cancer is not as uncommon as people think. In 2008 an estimated 34,000 cancers of the mouth and throat were diagnosed. In order to minimize your risk of developing oral cancer, be aware of habits that increase your risk.

Risk Factors for Oral Cancer include:

  • Use of smoking or chewing tobacco: Tobacco smokers have 5-9 times greater risk of developing this cancer than non-users; snuff and chewing tobacco users have a four times greater risk than non-users.
  • Excessive use of alcohol: Moderate to heavy drinkers at are 3-9 times greater risk than non-drinkers.
  • Exposure to sun: Chronic sun exposure is associated with development of lip cancers.
  • Certain viral infections such as the human papilloma virus that can cause cervical cancer in women can also cause oral cancer.
  • Compromised immune (resistance) systems that are not functioning properly can be associated with cancers.
  • Poor nutrition including diets low in fruits and vegetables can increase risk for all cancers including oral cancer.
  • Family history: People carry a predisposition in their DNA (the genetic material they inherited from their parents) for developing cancer.

Oral Cancers Can Mimic Harmless Sores

Early signs of oral cancer can mimic harmless sores that occur in the mouth such as canker sores, minor infections, or irritations that occur from biting or eating certain foods. Cancers in the lip area can easily be mistaken for harmless sores.

Early Detection is Key

It is important to have regular oral examinations to detect signs of oral cancer. Although 90 percent of oral cancers occur in people who are over 40, it is becoming more prevalent in younger people, particularly those who adopt risky behaviors: smoking, drinking and oral sex.

  • If you notice any unusual lesions (sores or ulcers), or color changes (white or red patches), anywhere in your mouth that do not heal within two to three weeks, come and see us and have it examined immediately.
  • Definitive diagnosis may require a small biopsy, the microscopic examination of a piece of tissue from the affected area.

It is important not to let a suspicious sore go unchecked. If detected and treated early, while a lesion or growth is small, survival rates can exceed 80 percent. Contact us today to schedule an appointment to discuss your questions about oral cancer. You can also learn more by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Oral Cancer.”


By Sandusky and Lexington Dental Care
June 02, 2014
Category: Dental Procedures
Tags: veneers   prepless veneers  
No-PrepVeneersmaybeanOptionforSomePatients

Although traditional porcelain laminate veneers are much less invasive than other cosmetic dental applications, they still often require the removal of some of the surface tooth enamel, a process known as tooth reduction. Now, an alternative veneer treatment known as “no-prep” veneers eliminates this initial step of tooth reduction for some patients.

Although most reductions take very little of the tooth enamel, they do permanently alter the tooth. No-prep veneers are growing in popularity because the tooth is not permanently altered, allowing for two benefits: if desired, the veneer application can be reversed and the tooth returned to its original state; and there's more flexibility for patients to “test-drive” their new look with prototype veneers worn while the permanent veneers are manufactured, with changes made easily during this tryout period.

Dentists have long regarded at least a minimum of tooth reduction as absolutely necessary for the proper adhesion of veneers, and to avoid a bulky or over-contoured smile. And, while advances in no-prep veneers have largely addressed these concerns, it is true this option isn't for every patient considering a veneer application.

For example, patients with large or forward-positioned teeth are not good candidates for no-prep veneers. Patients who choose a veneer treatment over orthodontic treatment for certain conditions will likely need some tooth preparation to achieve an acceptable aesthetic result. For patients generally, no-prep veneers have a limited application range on the bottom jaw due to space limitations.

Simply put, traditional veneers are a more versatile option for most patients. On the other hand, no-prep veneers can be a good choice for patients with genetically small or misshapen teeth, teeth reduced by erosion or grinding, or those with narrow or diminished smiles.

If you're considering this option, our first step is to conduct a complete examination of your teeth and mouth. We'll carefully evaluate every aspect of your mouth structure and overall dental condition. If you fit the criteria, you may be able to avoid tooth reduction and still gain the smile you desire.

If you would like more information on no-prep veneers, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Porcelain Veneers Without the Drill.”




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